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Special Feature: The War of 1812

Well into the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, Canada's History is highlighting the documentaries, publications, events and historical research being released over the coming year.

War of 1812 re-enactors in Fanshawe

 

From the Battle of Queenston Heights to the burning of Washington to the little-known role of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment, this series of videos hosted by Tim Compeau brings to life the major events of the conflict.

 

In early 1813 the New Brunswick 104th Regiment of Foot marched more than 1100 kilometers from Fredricton to Kingston in Ontario. Executive Director of the St. John River Society tells us about the event and its historical context in this podcast.

 

Twenty takes on a war that shaped Canada.

 

From books to films and comics to games — a list of resources to help excite and inform your students about 1812.

 

James Laxer, author of Tecumseh and Brock, discusses events of the war and the unlikely alliance between these two "warriors."

 

A diligent reader offers another artist's interpretation of images for Tecumseh and Brock.

 

What makes the Canadian War Museum’s new exhibition 1812: One War, Four Perspectives so fascinating? It forgoes simplistic approaches for a deeper, although necessarily not exhaustive, exploration of four different points of view. By Nancy Payne, Editor, Kayak

 

History Television's documentary investigates a lesser known event from the conflict, and follows archaeologists and historians as they seek new answers. Listen to our podcast interview with writer, director, and producer Mick Grogan.

 

The War of 1812 in many ways shaped the future of the continent. Canada's History Editor in Chief Mark Reid toured the Niagara Peninsula to visit many of the key battlefields that helped decide the course of the conflict.

 

Read a selection of writing by Isaac Brock, military leader and administrator of Upper Canada during the War of 1812. He wrote mostly about politics, current affairs, and military life.

 

A guide to the seven different regions in Ontario that have been commemorating the War of 1812 with special events, projects, and activities.

 

War of 1812The History Experts

PBS's The War of 1812 interviewed twenty-six leading authorities on the war — American, British, Canadian and First Nations historians — presenting important accounts and research. Find more of their works and websites.

 

War of 1812Behind the Scenes

The PBS documentary The War of 1812 uses stunning re-enactments, evocative animation, and incisive commentary of key experts to reveal little-known sides of an important war. You can watch the trailer, listen to an interview with director Larry Hott, and flip through our photo gallery.

 

War of 1812 — Fanshawe Pioneer Village

Fanshawe Pioneer Village in London, Ontario, has been stagind re-enactments of the War of 1812. The next one will be held October 4, 2014. See photos from the Grand Tactical re-enactment held on October 1st, 2011. The event featured hundreds of reenactors bringing the excitement of the time period back to life.


A Day for Laurier

Few Canadians may be aware of it, but Laurier, like Sir John A. Macdonald, has a special day named after him.  

Open Book: Finding Franklin

An excerpt from Russell A. Potter’s new book about the search for the explorer’s lost ships.

Roots: Origin Stories

DNA testing seems like the key to unlocking your family's ethnic history. But is it really?

Scooping the War

For the cameramen of the Second World War, half the battle was about making their film the first to hit the newsreels.  

Bows and Arrows

The Indigenous hunters of the Plains were skilled archers on horseback, and their expertise has become one of the prevailing images of the Old West.  

Selling the Prairie Good Life

A century ago Canada West magazine beat the drums for immigrants to fill the vast unbroken prairie. But those drums beat louder in some places than others.

The Roma in Peterborough

When sixty “gypsies” set up camp on an extension of George Street in Peterborough, Ontario, in the early summer of 1909, they caused a sensation.

Sir Wilfrid Laurier and Canada's Jews

In the annals of Canadian Jewish history, it is well known that Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier is alleged to have promised part of Manitoba to the Jews as a place where they might be granted “a measure of self-government.”

The Lessons of the Anti-Asiatic Riot

In 1907, an anti-immigration rally explodes into violence and vandalism in Vancouver's Chinatown and Japantown.

The Many Faces of the French Fact

French Canadian, a term rooted in common ancestry, religion, and language, gave way to Québécois, one based on territory and language. No longer did one have to be Catholic or French Canadian to embrace the new identity.

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