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United Nations Association in Canada

United Nations Association in Canada

The United Nations Association in Canada (UNA-Canada) is a charitable organization, dedicated to educating Canadians about critical international issues and the work of the United Nations. Over the years, the UNA-Canada has developed a number of educational programs that make great resources for teachers:

UN Peacekeeping: This program was developed in 2006 to mark the 50th anniversary of UN peacekeeping. A complete teacher’s handbook can be downloaded for free, and contains 4 lessons (with 10 activities) designed for Grades 10-12 and Secondary 5. The classroom activities enable students to further their understanding of peacekeeping by examining Canada’s historical and contemporary role in international matters.

A World Without Weapons: This full resource package is designed for secondary-level classes and investigates themes and topics related to disarmament. A variety of activities through 6 different lessons are designed to provoke conversations and inquiry around complex global issues.

What Kind of World…?: These lessons are designed for teaching elementary-level students about the UN and their place in the global community. The lessons include fun activities (like group juggling!) to help students understand international issues and relations, and the importance of communication and cooperation.

Refugees: A Canadian Experience: This package provides teachers with content and methods for teaching secondary-level students about refugees, human rights, asylum, and resettlement. Through simulation, inquiry, and discussion, students gain a better understanding of issues that may cause a refugee to leave their country and the difficulty they may have adjusting to a new home.

Bring the world into your classroom! Visit unac.org to learn more.

 

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