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The Canadian Patriotic Fund, 1914–1919

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Author: Connie Wyatt Anderson, 2014 recipient of the Governor General’s History Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Article Title + Magazine Issue: “Waiting at Home” p.20 to p.23 in the 2016 Remembrance Day digital issue of Kayak: Canada’s History Magazine for Kids.

Grade Level: Elementary (K–4, with adaptions)

Subject Area: Social Studies/Art

Theme(s):

• War and the Canadian Experience
• Peace & Conflict

Lesson Overview:
In this lesson students explore the role of the Canadian Patriotic Fund during the First World War.

Time Required: 2–3 lessons

Historical Thinking Concept(s):

• Use primary source evidence
• Analyze cause and consequence

Learning Outcomes:
Student will:

Identify the role of the Canadian Patriotic Fund.
Recognize the role of Canadians on the “home front” during the First World War.
Draw/visually depict images representing ways in which Canadians supported soldiers in Europe in the First World War.

Background Information:
The Canadian Patriotic Fund was a private organization which co-coordinated fundraising and provided monthly grants to wives and dependents of soldiers. The Fund was headed by Montreal businessman and Conservative Member of Parliament Sir Herbert Brown Ames. Its principal tasks—fundraising, relief, and the provision of social advice to recipients—were carried out primarily by hundreds of women who acted as volunteer social workers.

The Lesson Activity:

Activating: How will students be prepared for learning?
Write the following statement on the board: At the time of the First World War, Canada’s population was about eight million. Most of them fought the Great War at home.
Ask: What does this statement mean? How could a war be fought at “home”? What could people in Canada do to support the war effort in Europe? Who do you think the main “fighters” at home were: men or women? Why?
Circulate several images of posters printed by the Canadian Patriotic Fund.
Ask: What do you think the aim of the Canadian Patriotic Fund was? Who was the chief recipient of their aid?
Provide an overview of the Canadian Patriotic Fund.

Acquiring: What strategies facilitate learning for groups and individuals?
Distribute Patriotic Fund Supporter/1917 – pin, one to each student [cut them out beforehand]. Instruct the students to affix them to their person (tape, pin).
Read aloud page 21 “Waiting at Home.”
Brainstorm and make a list of on the board a number of ways people “at home” can support a war effort abroad.
Expand by asking: what consequences did the war have on life for Canadians at home?

Applying: How will students demonstrate their understanding?
Instruct students to design a class bulletin board displaying the information they have generated.
Tell them to remove their Patriotic Fund Supporter/1917 – pins and affix them to the bulletin board to form a perimeter.
Have students draw and colour images representing ways in which Canadians supported soldiers in Europe in the First World War [money, food, clothing, letters of support, women working in factories, children volunteering, etc.]
Affix the students’ drawings to the bulletin board. Be sure to give the display a clear title.

Materials/Resources:
Patriotic Fund Supporter/1917 — pin, one for each student — Attachment 1
Several Canadian Patriotic Fund posters
Bulletin board space
Art supplies – paper, coloured pencils, etc.

References:

http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/en/explore/online/posters/fund.aspx

http://www.warmuseum.ca/firstworldwar/history/life-at-home-during-the-war/ the-home-front/the-canadian-patriotic-fund/

http://www.virtualreferencelibrary.ca/search.jspN=38537&searchPageType=vrl&Ntk=Subject_Search_Interface&Ntt=Canadian+Patriotic+Fund&view=grid&Erp=20

Attachment 1: Patriotic Fund Supporter/1917 – Pin
See downloads for print friendly version
Patriotic Fund Pin - Attachment 1














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