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The Weight of Command: Voices of Canada’s Second World War Generals and Those Who Knew Them
J.L. Granatstein

Three-quarters of a century after the Second World War, almost all the participants are gone. This book contains interviews with and about the Canadian generals who led the troops during that war. Edited and introduced by one of the foremost military historians of our time, this carefully curated collection brings to life the generals and their wartime experiences. The interviews are based on lengthy conversations that J.L. Granatstein had with the surviving generals, their key staff officers, fighters under their command, and their families. In this book, we learn how and why so much was accomplished from the memories of those who were there. We also learn of the mistakes made and the high cost paid in lives and suffering.

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Dispatches from the Front: Matthew Halton, Canada’s Voice at War
David Halton

Originally a reporter for the Toronto Star, Matt Halton, as Senior War Correspondent for the CBC during the Second World War, reported from the front lines in Italy and Northwest Europe, and became "the voice of Canada at war."

For a decade he chronicled Europe's drift to disaster, covering the breakdown of the League of Nations, the Spanish Civil War, and the Nazi takeover of Austria and Czechoslovakia. Along the way he interviewed Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Herman Goering, Neville Chamberlain, Charles de Gaulle, Mahatma Gandhi, and dozens of others who shaped the history of the last century.

Drawing on extensive interviews and archival research, this definitive biography, written by Matthew's son, acclaimed former CBC correspondent David Halton, is a fascinating look at the career of one of the most accomplished journalists Canada has ever known.

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The Little Third Reich on Lake Superior: A History of Canadian Internment Camp R
Ernest Robert Zimmermann

For eighteen months during the Second World War, the Canadian military interned 1,145 prisoners of war in Red Rock, Ontario (about 100 kilometres northeast of Thunder Bay). Camp R interned friend and foe alike: Nazis, anti-Nazis, Jews, soldiers, merchant seamen, and refugees whom Britain feared might comprise Hitler’s rumoured “fifth column” of alien enemies residing within the Commonwealth. For the first time and in riveting detail, the author illuminates the conditions in one of Canada’s forgotten POW camps. Backed by interviews and meticulous archival research, Zimmermann fleshes out this rich history in an accessible, lively manner. The Little Third Reich on Lake Superior will captivate military and political historians as well as non-specialists interested in the history of POWs and internment in Canada.

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The Royal Newfoundland Regiment in the Great War
Frank Gogos

In 1914, the Dominion of Newfoundland stepped forward to stand to arms in aid of the British Empire, mobilizing a generation of young volunteers to fight the Central Powers. Unlike her Imperial cousins, this rugged North Atlantic country did not have a standing army. From this inauspicious beginning, the 1st Newfoundland Regiment evolved into one of the toughest and most respected fighting units in the First World War, the only Regiment serving in the armies of the British Empire to be awarded the title “Royal” during these hostilities. But the fighting cost them dearly. With more than 400 photographs and 40 maps, this history of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment is a tribute to those who served and a guide for those who wish to retrace the soldiers’ steps. It is the essential travel companion to the battlefields and memorials of the Newfoundland Contingent in the Great War.

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The Best Little Army in the World: The Canadians in Northwest Europe, 1944-1945
J.L. Granatstein

This is the story of the Canadian First Army that fought its way from Juno Beach at D-Day in June, 1944, through Normandy, into the Netherlands to liberate that country, to the terrible battles in the Scheldt area, and finally into Germany in 1945. This is also the story of how Canada, which had no army to speak of in 1939, raised a citizen army and turned it into one of the very best fighting armies in World War II, one which helped defeat the most implacable, desperate and battle-hardened German army over the course of 11 months in ’44 and ’45. Canada has always produced astonishingly effective soldiers, and this book is about one of their finest moments.

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